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Ex-GOP Gov’s Staff Misled Black Voters with SHADY Robocalls

Today, the 2010 campaign manager for ex-Republican Governor of Maryland Robert Ehrlich was found guilty of authorizing the use of  robocalls that misled registered (predominantly Black) voters into believing that the election was already won.

According to The Root, the calls were sent out to 11,000 homes in the Baltimore area, imploring them to “Relax,” stating clearly that “Governor O’Malley and President Obama have been successful.” These calls clearly targeted Black voters, hitting majority-Black areas with chilling efficiency.

From The Root:

“Knowing a couple of important points may help those outside Maryland understand the Republican candidate’s effort. First, the calls were all targeted at Baltimore City and Prince George’s County — the two largest majority-black jurisdictions in the state. Second, President Obama wasn’t even on the ballot in 2010. So ubiquitous were the calls in African-American homes in Baltimore that at least one of the calls went to the home of the (African-American) judge presiding over the case.”

Listen to the Election Night Robocall HERE

These kinds of shady tactics were nothing new to Gov. Ehrlich; Back in 2006, Ehrlich went as far as hiring Black homeless men from Philadelphia to hand out red, black and green campaign flyers that featured a completely false list of prominent black supporters;

“Flyers and sample ballots handed out at polls that day by the campaigns of Ehrlich and his then-lieutenant governor, Michael Steele (now an MSNBC commentator and a contributing editor for The Root, and the former embattled chair of the Republican National Committee), featured a red, black and green kente cloth design and falsely suggested that black leaders such as former NAACP head Kweisi Mfume and other black Maryland officials were endorsing Ehrlich and Steele. In fact, the African-American leaders featured on the flyer had endorsed Ehrlich’s opponent.

The plan backfired when the black leaders went to the press on Election Day denouncing the misleading use of their names and images on the sample ballots. As this incident demonstrates, confusing black voters is a good deal more complicated than just keeping them away from the polls. And perhaps this inspired the robocall approval.”

Read the rest of this article here.

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: The powers that be do NOT want you to vote!

How widespread do you think Black voter suppression is in American politics?

How can we as a community counteract these beyond shady practices?

Sound off below!