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News Flash

Man quits Wall Street job to make a difference in the lives of youth

Marquis Taylor, 29, used to be a professional on Wall Street, but he left his six figure gig in real estate finance to fully dedicate his time to youth.

Through his grassroots organization Coaching4Change, Taylor works with low-income adolescents by actively presenting them with a positive black male image.

Taylor works with disengaged high school students who are on the verge of dropping out. Why? Because it was once him at a point in time.

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Featured Post

Coming Out: African Boi

A Journey of Self-Acceptance: Being gay and African

“Where you from”, he asked. “Baltimore”. I replied. He chuckled softly in disbelief and asked a second time. Unable to keep the charades going any longer, I decided to come clean and disclose the origin of my accent. As the conversation progressed, I slowly came to the realization that the “Operation Find a Boyfriend” was becoming a failed mission. The moment he asked how far away I lived was the sign and the constant rubbing of my back was the signal. The downward spiral of our conversation was all too familiar: boy meets boy, boy likes boy, boy hears more, boy flees scene. Unable to keep the conversation going any longer, I bade my farewell and exited the bar to my humble abode. Just a few years ago, the prospect of being in a gay establishment, especially a bar or club, was unfathomable.

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News Flash

National Coming Out Day, Embrace who YOU are

Today is National Coming Out Day.  Millions of members of the LGBTQ community and its allies will celebrate, reflect upon and contemplate the moment when they came out. Many won’t either because they have yet to do so. Whatever your decision, remember that it’s personal and for YOU to make alone.

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News Flash

Viral photo looks like principal is choking student

Twelve students were suspended this week after a photo of a principal appearing to choke a female student went viral.

Pittsburg High School Principal Todd Whitmire said the photo was taken last Friday as he restrained the girl who refused to stop fighting with a classmate.

The photo went viral immediately.

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News Flash

Students can’t graduate unless they get accepted into college

A high school in Oregon wants to add an additional requirement to its graduation policy.

Corbett High School’s principal wants to mandate that each student apply for and get accepted into a college or trade school before walking across the stage.

The principal of Corbett High School says the students wouldn’t have to follow through and attend the school - he simply wants this to be a lesson in the application process. If a student can’t afford any application fees, the school has grants that will cover the cost. 

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Featured Post
[photo of Sophia Nahli Allison]
All posts by Sophia Nahli Allison »

Graduation: Voices and Images of Chicago Youth Violence

This is an introduction to a series of ongoing posts featuring youth voices and images from Graduation, a multimedia project about Chicago youth violence. I hope to create a collection of youth voices working to create positive change, break negative stereotypes and provide insight into Chicago violence while challenging current social issues.

In 2010 I began collecting newspaper clippings about Chicago youth violence, and the growing number of youth killings haunted me. I knew I wanted to do something but I wasn’t sure what kind of impact I could make.  In 2011 reality struck closer to home when my cousin Cam was killed to gun violence.  Although Cam wasn’t a youth, seeing the grief and irreversible devastation my family experienced made my urge to make a difference stronger.

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News Flash

Former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick sentenced to 28 years in prison

Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick has been sentenced to 28 years in prison.

Kilpatrick, 43, was convicted of 24 counts including racketeering and extortion in March.

At least 18 officials have been convicted during his tenure as mayor.

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News Flash

Blacks hit hardest by shutdown

All Americans are feeling the affects of the government shutdown, but according to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, African Americans are getting hit particularly hard during the hiatus.

Government jobs have been more available to Blacks than private sector employment over the years thanks to de jure segregation.

People of color represent 34 percent of the federal workforce, and make up 37 percent of the U.S. population overall. 

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News Flash

Jobs report: Unemployment highest in six months amid shutdown

According to The U.S. Labor Department, new weekly claims for unemployment benefits jumped by 66,000 to 374,000 last week, the highest in six months.

One-fourth of the new claims were due to private-sector workers filing for unemployment in result of the government shutdown.

Thursdays claims report did not include any federal workers on furlough. Those are reported with a one week delay, so the numbers may be even higher.

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News Flash

Man who served 20 years due to wrongful conviction awarded $25 million

thad

Thaddeus Jimenez was just 13-years-old when he was convicted of Eric Morro’s murder in 1993 in Chicago.

He served nearly 20 years in prison for the crime that he says he didn’t commit.

Now a 7th Circuit judge has awarded Jimenez $25 million for the wrongful conviction.

From Courthouse News:

In 2009, the State’s Attorney and his own lawyers filed a motion to vacate the sentence based on what they claimed were the coercive tactics former Chicago police detective Jerome Bogucki employed upon potential witnesses during his investigation. The attorneys prevailed and Jimenez was eventually awarded a certificate of innocence. He then filed a complaint against the city and Bogucki on claims of malicious prosecution, deprivation of due process and conspiracy.

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