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News Flash

Macklemore to Kendrick: ‘I robbed you’

It was a big day for Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. The Seattle-based duo took home four GRAMMYs, and while he should be out celebrating, the rapper took to social media to post a photo of a text he sent to Kendrick Lamar. 

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News Flash

Study reveals promising approach for helping challenged students

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According to federal tests, by the time they reach eighth grade, half of all African American schoolboys have not mastered the most basic math skills.

A new study released by the National Bureau of Economic Research on Monday suggests a promising approach for helping challenged students. 

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News Flash

#BBUM students advance movement for more inclusion on campus with petition

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Black students at the University of Michigan have advanced their movement for a more inclusive and equal campus.

The petition labeled, “University of Michigan: Support Your Black Students,” is addressed to Dr. Mary Sue Coleman, president of the university. 

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News Flash

Elementary school principal suspended for using the n-word

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A Washington state principal has been placed on leave as the district reviews a complaint that she used the N-word.

Poulsbo Elementary School principal Claudia Alves used the N-word to explain the word’s meaning

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Featured Post

Why Macklemore beat your favorite rapper

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First, I’d like to start by saying that I do not think Macklemore is better than Kendrick Lamar. Other than “Thrift Shop” and “Same Love,” not much happening on his debut album in my opinion. But where Kendrick and other artists who probably should have been awarded GRAMMYs lacked, Macklemore gladly picked up the ball.

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News Flash

BREAKING: Shooting at South Carolina State University, at least 1 injured

There has been a shooting at South Carolina State University, a historically black university located in Orangeburg, SC. At least one person has been injured.

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News Flash

Killer of Sean Taylor sentenced to 57.5 years in prison

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The man convicted of murdering former Washington Redskins safety Sean Taylor has been sentenced to 57.5 years in prison for the crime.

The prosecution asked the judge hand down a minimum sentence of 60 years to Eric Rivera, because it did not believe that he could be rehabilitated in prison. 

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News Flash

NFL star Vince Young files for bankruptcy

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The man who was once referred to as “inVINCEable” has joined a growing list of ex-NFL stars who have filed for bankruptcy.

Vince Young, 30, the former University of Texas quarterback, and current NFL free agent filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. 

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News Flash

Color of Change petition urges District Attorney R. Seth Williams to drop charges against Darrin Manning

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Earlier we reported about charges being brought against 16-year-old Darrin Manning in connection with a stop-and-frisk. Manning was seriously injured by a Philadelphia policewoman during the incident, and is being charged with resisting arrest and misdemeanor  aggravated assault.

Color of Change is calling for District Attorney R. Seth Williams to drop all charges against Darrin and investigate the police officers involved. 

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Guest Post

Beth Richie on how anti-violence activism taught her to become a prison abolitionist

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This post originally appeared on Feminist Wire and was written by Dr. Beth Richie. Dr. Richie is engaged in several research projects designed to explore the relationship between violence against women in low-income African American communities and violence. For more information go to http://www.uic.edu/depts/wsweb/people/faculty/richie.

By: Dr. Beth Richie

Sometimes we learn our most profound political lessons in the contours of our everyday activism.  This is certainly the case for me as I recount my journey as a Black feminist activist working to end gender violence for the past 20 years, during which the United States was engaged in building itself up as the world’s leading prison nation. My journey began in Harlem, the renowned community in New York City that was at the center of struggles for racial and economic justice.  The on-the-ground work at the time included organizing for material changes (safe and affordable housing, better schools, accessible health care, jobs that offered a future, political representation, neighborhood businesses that support the local economy, and the end to growing expansion of the prison industrial complex). The organizing work was sustained by rhetoric about the “liberation of our people” and the vision of what our community would look like if we could sustain grassroots activism in the service of broad-based social change.

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