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Tag Archives: Frantz Fanon

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Black Apathy: Believing That Racism Is Normal

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgASe3CIw9E Along this path through American history my people have forgotten how to dream. My people are playing their part in making the black/white problem normal. How can you blame us? Our concept of “reality” constantly proves the impossibilities of our imagination, our creativity. What is real, for folks like us, has no conditions. Unfortunately, […]

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America’s Drama of the Race Game: Finding Hatred For Blacks Outside the Post-Racial Hype

La Haine_Vinz

It surprises me how much of the city builds a fantasy in a larger reality of racism. Outside of downtown and the “hood” there’s an intense atmosphere of hatred and disregard for people-of-color. Maybe people-of-color provokes the idealistic bubble of a city person; in places like Buffalo, New York the black person is breathing scum […]

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The Times of Body-Eating Racism: the return of black cannibals

Cannibal-feast-wazaap

All of a sudden cannibals are back and I’m worried what this means for Black people–folks that have historically been associated with ancient African cannibalism. A wave of cannibalism stories have surfaced in the last couple of weeks—two of them feature perpetrators of African descent. Although mainstream coverage has not spoken about these cases with […]

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Happy Holidays 2011 to Emmett Till From the Cotton Rebel Era

In the midst of my mindless consumption yesterday, I found the infamous Emmett Till on a clothing rack! Leaders 1354, Chicago’s local boutique that serves Hip-Hop hipsters, was selling the last of its Enstrumental feature. Ensturmental produced a shirt called, “The Revenge of Emmett Till”, this season, that definitely aroused a revolutionary spirit in me. It […]

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Wanna Be Startin Something: The Spirit of the Night

Here, on the pages of the Black Youth Project, us bloggers engage in a tradition of writing opinion pieces that may interest other Black youth. Often we comment on popular culture, racism (naturally), and politics; and most of the time we criticize heavilly, at least I do. Something feels incomplete, though, about the meditations I […]

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